RUN RUN SHAW
CREATIVE
MEDIA CENTRE
GRAND
OPENING
FESTIVAL
-
28/10/2011-
30/4/2012
White Walls Have Ears
Date : 29/10/2011 - 30/4/2012
(Closed on Sunday, Public Holidays except in April)
Time : 12 - 8pm
Venue : Inside CMC
Free admission.
The Machines

Remko Scha (The Netherlands)


Date : 7/4/2012 – 30/4/2012
(Closed on Sunday)
Time : 12 - 8pm
Venue : M9012, L9, CMC

Meet-the-Artist: Remko Scha

Date : 10/4/2012
Time : 5:30 - 6:30pm
Venue : Screening Theatre (M1052), L1, CMC

Free Admission
Conducted in English

Opening Reception

Date : 11/4/2012
Time : 6:30 - 8:15 pm
Venue : Staff Common Room (M8061), L8, CMC

Performance

Date : 11/4/2012
Time : 8:15pm
Venue : M9012, L9, CMC

Free Admission on a first-come, first-served basis.
Running time: approximately 50 minutes without interval.


The installation presents the automatic guitar band The Machines in continuous action. It employs several electric guitars and bass guitars which are suspended in mid-air. The instruments are played in a percussive manner by electric sabre saw motors which create standing waves in ropes that run across the open guitar strings. The oscillatory motion in the ropes creates syncopated rhythmical patterns in the guitar tones. When the vibrating speeds of the motors are varied, the rhythms change. Melodies emerge spontaneously because of shifting overtone patterns in the guitar strings.

Earlier versions of this installation were presented in the period 1983-1985 in Amsterdam, Berlin, Budapest, New York and San Francisco. Its music also published on audio-cassette, LP and CD.


Artist’s Statement

THE MACHINES

The Machines don't like emotion.
They like sound.
The Machines don't like expression.
They like noise.
The Machines don't think.
They hit their strings.
The Machines play loud.
The machines play fast.

The Machines don't stop. The beat goes on.
No electronics.
No synthesizers.
No computers.
No people.


About the Artist

Remko Scha, the producer of The Machines, was trained as a physical engineer in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. He worked as a researcher in Computational Linguistics at Philips' Research Labs (Eindhoven) and BBN Laboratories (Cambridge, Mass.), and taught at Tel Aviv University and the University of Amsterdam.

Most of Remko Scha's art projects are concerned with processes which generate musical or visual structures without conscious human control. In the early 1960's he started out with physics-based visual art (burning and melting plastic), and continued with conceptual pieces and algorithmic music. In 1966 he established The New Electric Chamber Music Ensemble, a noise-oriented musical improvisation group. In 1980 he launched ("The Machines", an automatic guitar band. In the 1990's he designed an image-generating computer program ("Artificial"), and created the Institute of Artificial Art Amsterdam (IAAA), a collective of machines, computers and humans, who work together toward the complete automatization of art production.

Scha also performed as a DJ on the Amsterdam pirate station "Radio 100". His theoretical and historical reflections on technological art were published in journals such as Mediamatic and Leonardo.

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Introduction

This seminal exhibition, the first of its kind in Hong Kong, showcases the artistic achievements of some of the most famous sound artists from home and abroad. Participants include: Christina Kubisch, Leung Chi Wo, Edwin Lo, Cédric Maridet, Kingsley Ng, Ed Osborn, Steve Roden, Remko Scha, Yeung Ngor-wah, Anthony and Samson Young.

Sound art is enjoying a newfound celebrity status, combining both visual and auditory elements that offer exciting opportunities for new forms of multimedia creativity. While contemporary culture is predominantly visual, sound art co-opts this fascination to re-awaken our sense of hearing. When presented in gallery environments, sound art fills white walled spaces with its sonorous envelope and voluminous bath of active vibrations. This exhibition reveals the intense poeticism that arises when sound comes into being within such white walls. Each of the exhibiting artists will choose a particular space within the Creative Media Centre to locate their work, and thereby enliven the building and enthral its visitors with their synesthetic art of seeing + hearing.

Curator

Samson Young (SCM Faculty)

Curatorial Statement

“Sound art responds to two contrary tractions in the practices of making and displaying art. One is the desire to burst boundaries, to tear down walls, to break out of the confined space of the gallery…[the other being the desire to] expand beyond the gallery, to ventilate the gallery with the sounds of what lies outside it, or to temporalize place.” – Steve Conner

Sound art is on the cusp of stardom.

That much acknowledged, in my conversation with practitioners and curators of sound art, I often detect a sense of uneasiness and discomfort with sound’s newfound celebrity status. This feeling comes in many guises, but they invariably touch on a single recurring theme, which I will sum up as follows: the sentiment that sound art is succumbing to the tyranny of seeing, and by doing so, diluting its potency and essence as a culture that focuses on the sense of hearing.

Sure, sound diffuses, and it does not care to be confined to any one space; but this point is all too obvious, as old as the very first occurrence of sound itself. As a response it is lacking in even the most basic attempt to formulate specific aesthetic criteria, leaving sound art in the wilderness (where it happily exists of course). I am interested in finer distinctions, systems, and frames. The artists and curators I spoke with were referring to a specific variant of sound art, which is, the kind of sound art that circulate in the contemporary art world, through museums and galleries and the well-oiled curatorial machineries that operate within them. These machineries are designed according to the logics required by the eye. So when sound comes into the white wall space to play, its tendency to leak through physical and temporal boundaries make for intriguing ironies. And I say intriguing ironies in the most positive sense, for these ironies articulate not only a process of domestication, but also a mutually beneficial symbiosis. Sound isn’t always fragile and ethereal, lying dormant and passively awaiting its fate to be diluted. Sound also has moments of aggression. It desires to make itself heard. So while white walls attempt to confine sound, sound is in turn invading spaces with its sonorous envelope, its voluminous bath of active vibrations.

In carefully engineered concert spaces or technologically mediated listening chambers where acoustic conditions are “ideal,” the act of listening is a presupposition – an imposition. In the gallery space sound art is strategic in nature, and it puts forward an invitation to listen instead. This invitation is extended through sonically evocative visual-spatial artifacts. Each of the artists featured in this exhibition are faced with the distinct problem – or opportunity – of mediating sounds through artifacts. These artifacts may include the very technologies through which sound is transmitted and generated, reimagined as sculptural objects (Edwin Lo, Kingsley Ng, Cédric Maridet); objects and sonic objects that embody fleeting traces of sounding at some point back in time (Leung Chi Wo, Samson Young); or documentation of listening as a performative gesture (Yeung Ngor-wah, Anthony). What all of them share, however, is the desire to ventilate walls with the sound of what lies outside of them.

To quote Helmut Draxler, “what is at stake here is ultimately nothing less than how exactly the concrete experiences of hearing and perceiving interact with the cultural codes that structure and presuppose them but which those experience can also call into question time and again.” Sound bursts boundaries, but it can also put up walls. White walls confine sound, but walls too have ears. This exhibition is about the many tales, contradictions, ironies, and moments of intense poeticism that arise when sound come into being within the white walls.

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Outfield
Ed Osborn (USA)
- Exhibition Dates Extended to Next April


Date : 29/10/2011 - 30/4/2012
(Closed on Sundays, Public Holidays except in April)
Time : 12 - 8pm
Venue : L3


Outfield is a kinetic installation made from a variety of sound-producing electromechanical objects and an array of small loudspeakers. The objects (motors and relays which activate mechanical devices) are controlled by a set of microprocessors that communicate with each other and form a network that shapes the overall behavior of the installation. The loudspeakers play subtly-altered recordings of the objects; these recordings blend with and augment the acoustic space generated by the objects. As they do so they reveal delicate distinctions in texture between the live and recorded sounds. As a result, a complex set of systemic interrelationships and causalities emerges over time from the actions of the individual objects, the patterns of their activities, and the interplay between live and recorded sound. The viewer as listener is immersed in a continually shifting field of the physical sounds of electronic activity, and electronic sounds of physical motion.

The combination of kinetic, sonic, and visual elements serves to create an immersive environment in which the terrain of activity continually shifts and evolves in an organic manner. The behaviors of Outfield form a deeply layered physical hocketing (call and response patterning) which blend sound and physical space in a visceral manner.

Artist’s Statement

I work in a variety of media and formats including video, performance, and sculpture, but my primary focus is on kinetic, sound-based installations that incorporate movement and audio in a way that appears organic in nature and has a tangible physical presence. This combination creates a particular aura for each work that is lifelike and alluring. While my works are usually presented in the contexts of sound art or technology-based arts, they are not themselves concerned with displaying particular characteristics of new technologies. Rather, they use as a starting point the idea of sound as an effective medium to monitor activity over time. From this basis, I develop complex systems of motion and sound that are both visually and aurally absorbing. By focusing on the slowly shifting behavioral characteristics of the works instead of their technical machinations, I am able to produce pieces that hold attention over long periods.

About the Artist

Ed Osborn works with many forms of electronic media including installation, video, sound, and, performance. His pieces show a tactile sense of space, movement, image and aurality combined with a precise economy of materials. Osborn has received grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Creative Work Fund, and Arts International and been awarded residencies from the DAAD Artists-in-Berlin Program, the Banff Centre for the Arts, Het Apollohuis (Eindhoven, Netherlands), STEIM (Amsterdam), the Djerassi Resident Artist Program (Woodside, CA), and the Center for Research and Computing in the Arts at UC San Diego.

He has presented his work worldwide with exhibitions at the singuhr-hörgalerie (Berlin, Germany), the Berkeley Art Museum (Berkeley, CA), Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco), Artspace (Sydney, Australia), the Institute of Modern Art (Brisbane, Australia), Sonambiente Festival (Berlin, Germany), the Kiasma Museum, (Helsinki, Finland), MassMOCA (North Adams, MA), the Auckland Art Gallery (Auckland, NZ), and the Sonic Arts Research Centre (Belfast, Northern Ireland) among many others. He has lectured and taught in numerous institutions and is Assistant Professor in the Visual Art Department at Brown University.

For more information see www.roving.net.

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Six Local Sound Artists Converse With Space

Date : 17/12/2011 - 30/4/2012
(Closed on Sunday, Public Holidays except in April)
Time : 12 - 8pm
Venue : L9

Opening Reception
Date : 16/12/2011
Time : 6:30pm
Venue : L9

Also on the day:
Archiving Marble Road

Field Recording Showcase by
Budding Sound Artists From School of Creative Media
6:30pm-8pm, Screening Room 5, L6, CMC


Voices lapsed

Leung Chi Wo
2011
Sound Installation


Artist’s Statement

Voices lapsed is about the voice of the present of the past, translated and transformed. Two interviewees from my previous project Domestica Invisibile have already passed away. One mid-career American arts writer, who witnessed the development of Asian contemporary art, and one young Japanese multi-media artist from the snow country talk about their home. And we listen and ponder over the words voiced for the people who once uttered. Specially to cmbb.

Original interviewees:

Jonathan Napack (1967-2007) was a correspondent for The Art Newspaper and official representative for Art Basel. He started his writing career for a number of publications in New York including New York Observer and Spy, before moving to Hong Kong in 1997 where he became increasingly involved in the Chinese contemporary art world.

Hiroaki Muragishi 村岸宏昭 (1984-2006) was a philosophy student and a self-taught musician and artist in Sapporo. He wrote and played experimental music; and exhibited multi-media installations. He also took the lead role in Singaporean filmmaker Royston Tan’s short film Monkey Love.

New recording by:

Mimi Brown is the founder of the new non-profit art centre Spring Workshop and a board member of the Asia Art Archive.

Robin Peckham is an art critic, curator and the founding director of Saamlung, commercial gallery and project office in Hong Kong.

Ko Hasegawa is a hair stylist and founding artistic director of Voi Voi Rakkaus in Hong Kong.

Hitomi Hasegawa is a researcher, curator and the founder of the Moving Image Archive of Contemporary Art in Tokyo.

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Seven Rooms

Edwin Lo
2011
Site-specific sound installation


Artist’s Statement

As I entered the building for the first time I had the feeling that sounds are the dynamic organs of this geometrically-shaped building: machines, air-conditioning, and some unknown soundings from rooms and places … these sounds constitute the internal resonances of the building. In this site-specific sound installation for M9270, the soundscape of the space is manipulated at micro level and circulated through speakers. This gesture corresponds to the soundscape and resonance of the space. These sounds become attached to our auditory perception of place.  

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Etude: sound/scape I

Kingsley Ng
2011
Sound walk


Artist’s Statement

This is an etude - a soundscape of two distinctive contours; the cityscape and landscape of our city synthesise a musical score on the rooftop of the School of Creative Media Centre.

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Auscultation I

Cédric Maridet
2011
Sound installation, 4 channels


Artist’s Statement

Auscultation I explores the concept of sonic architecture and the production of a particular sound quality resulting from the inter-relationships between a built space, a sound environment and social practices. Based on the idea that qualities of sound are not inherent to the object, but are shaped by a perceptive act, this site-specific installation focuses on a sensitive practice of sound through the set up of conditions for a focused listening over a long period of both recorded and natural sound events.

The act of listening is highlighted in the Latin etymology of the term auscultation and it also refers directly to the neologism “mediate auscultation” created by Renée Laennec in his treatise published in 1819 dealing with his invention of the stethoscope and its usage.

In Auscultation I, the built space plays the role of a sensitive membrane that equally emits and receives sounds. Walls, pipes, lifts, electrical system and appliances are auscultated with contact microphones on surfaces of the building and pick up coils, which receive and amplify electro-magnetic fields. These recorded sounds are then diffused intermittently through the walls of the building itself with transducers.

The temporally and spectrally processed sounds merge and resonate along the direct sounds of the environment, articulating a new architectural and listening space.

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Listen Within ...( )... Live Without

Yeung Ngor-wah, Anthony
2011
Exercise for ears


Artist’s Statement

Hello.
Are you speaking too much?
You may never know.

Are you speaking too little?
If you think so, you are on the right track with this exercise.

‘Listen Within ...( )... Live Without’

Listen within –

a state of silent conversation with oneself,
a moment of recognition.
This is an act of reaching out with open arms.

Live without –
though it may not be understood, it can be learnt.
This time, our sense of hearing is the focus.

In between, there is a path we have to go through anyways.

Please take this exercise. Fill in the questionnaire along the path.

Also, watch some videos here before you start.
Enjoy the day and good luck!


― Anthony Yeung,
asoniclab@me.com
4 Dec 2011




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Signal Path II: Sinister Resonance (2011)

Samson Young
2011
Site-specific sound installation


Artist’s Statement

I meditated at various locations inside of the building while wearing a sensor that turns my brainwaves into sound. Sensors monitor eight sets of electroencephalographic signals while I attempt to focus my attention. Each signal generates one sine-tone or square-wave. Each tone occupies a specific frequency range. When attention level is above a certain threshold, tones will be redistributed to approximate the harmonic series, producing a "fat," “harmonious” field of sound. Paradoxically, as soon as I became aware of the alignment of tones, I am distracted. This constant focus-distraction constitutes a perpetual signal feedback loop that “short-circuits” the sense of hearing. The sound of my meditation was then recorded and played back via small media players, installed at the same spots where I once meditated.

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About the Artists

Leung Chi Wo

Born in Hong Kong in 1968 and graduated with a Master of Fine Arts from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Leung Chi Wo co-founded Para/Site Art Space in 1996. He is the recipient of the Asian Cultural Council fellowship (1997), Urban Council Award of the Contemporary Hong Kong Art Biennial (1997), and the first prize in sculpture from the Philippe Charriol Art Foundation (1995). In 2001, his site-specific project was exhibited in the first Hong Kong pavilion of the Venice Biennale. Recent exhibitions include Busan Biennale (2006), Guangzhou Triennial (2008), “Lights Out” in Museu da Imagem e do Som, São Paulo (2008), solo project in quartier21/MuseumsQuartier, Vienna (2009) and “No Soul For Sale” in Tate Modern, London (2010).

Edwin Lo

Born in 1984. Edwin Lo is a sound artist, sound designer, field recordist and phonographer form Hong Kong graduated from School of Creative Media (SCM), City University of Hong Kong. Through different explorations on sound, Edwin Lo tries to develop his own philosophy and language on sound and listening: thinking sound as an object of desire, as haunting memories and experiences, articulation of our consciousness and awareness on listening and the evolution of listening. Edwin Lo’s sound works were published in various places such as Hong Kong, China, Japan and Mexico. In 2007, he established Rabbit Travelogue with video and film director Rita Hui and they are producing an on-going dialogue between sound and vision. Lo’s sound works were exhibited since 2008 in various local and overseas exhibitions such as Hong Kong Sound Station, Shenzhen & Hong Kong Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism \ Architecture 2009, SoundLab (2009, 2010), FILE 2010 - Electronic Language International Festival and EMERGEANDSEE Media Art Festival (2010). In 2010 spring, he finished his new granted project supported by Hong Kong Art Development Council.

Kingsley Ng

Ng works primarily in conceptual, site-specific and community-oriented projects. He crafts relationship between the work and its context through interdisciplinary media, including interactive installation, public workshop, sound and spatial design.

Ng received his Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours) from the Ryerson University in Canada in 2003, and a Postgraduate Diploma from Le Fresnoy – National Studio of Contemporary Arts in France with its highest honour “les felicitation du jury à l’unanimité” in 2005. At Le Fresnoy, he studied under renowned artists such as - Andrea Cera, Bruno Dumont, Alain Fleischer, Jean-Luc Godard, Gary Hill, Antoni Muntadas, Atau Tanaka and Charles Sandison.

His projects have been featured internationally, such as the Lille Europe Pavilion in Shanghai Expo, Wien Kunsthalle in Austria, Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennial in Japan, IRCAM – Centre Pompidou in France, Fabrica Centre in Italy, InterAccess Electronic Media Arts Centre in Canada, Museum of Art in Hong Kong, and the Hong Kong & Shenzhen Bi-city Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture.

He is recipient of a number of grants and awards, including the Hong Kong Contemporary Art Biennial Awards 2009, the Hong Kong Young Design Talent Awards 2008, the Hong Kong Independent Short Film & Video Gold Medal Awards 2007, the Canada Council for the Arts – Travel Grants to Media Artists 2006, and the InterAccess Visual Arts Award 2003. He was a part-time lecturer at Hong Kong Baptist University in 2008, and was an artist-in-residence at Cité internationale des arts Paris in 2010.

Cédric Maridet

Cédric Maridet is an artist, theorist and researcher. He completed his Doctorate degree in Media Art in 2009 at the School of Creative Media, City University of Hong Kong. His solo and collaborative works have been presented internationally including New York (Art in General and Ramiken Crucible), Paris (Théatre de la Villette), Vienna (IG Bildende Kunst), Cambridge (Kettle’s Yard), London (Turbine Hall, Tate Modern), Hong Kong (Para/Site, Osage Gallery, Hong Kong Museum of Art), and he was awarded Prize of Excellence in the Hong Kong Art Biennial 2005. Maridet has participated in several residencies and symposiums on field recording, listening theories and the aesthetics of sound, such as the Pierre Schaeffer symposium 2010 co-organised by GRM and in the EMF-EMS 2011 conference in New York University. His writings have been published in two books: Around (soundpocket, 2010), and Who Cares? 16 essays on curating in Asia, (Para/Site, 2010). Since 2007, Maridet has been contributing to the French-based research lab in audio art Locus Sonus, and is currently a member of NMSAT Scientific Committee. He is also advisor for Soundpocket, a non-profit organisation promoting sound art and culture. His works have been published as CD and book releases on monème (www.moneme.com), a platform founded by Maridet.

Yeung Ngor-wah, Anthony

Yeung Ngor-wah, Anthony graduated from the Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts majoring in Theatre Sound and Music Recording in 1991. He has been active in theatre sound design for over 20 years. He is also a sound engineer specialising in audio mastering and classical music recording. He founded ‘A Asterisk Music’ which offers sound engineering supports to major labels and independent musicians. In 2003, he received the Best Sound Design in the 12th Hong Kong Drama Award and began his interest in sound art. In that summer, he had a chance to work with Para/Site Collective in the 50th Venice Biennale for 'Natvigating The Dot' (2003). Afterwards, he keeps on making objects, Drawer no.1 (2003), Drawer no.2 (2004); presenting installation works, Ticking Love 1:64 (2005), Still Moving (2007); composing sound works, Slang Mumble Competition (2008) for 'Art Responds to 14QK exhibition'; doing live performances, Tone Playing (2007) for 'Unpleasant Performance' and Exchanging Ambience (2010).

For theatre, recent productions include Six Degrees, Tales of Two Cities – Hong Kong • Shanghai • Eileen Chang, Dao • Extraordinaire and Very Dance! by City Contemporary Dance Company; Asian Youth Orchestra, 20th Anniversary Concert by Asian Youth Orchestra; Sylvia and its re-run by Kearen Pang Productions and also Dracula by Chung Ying Theatre Company.

He has been an adviser in the sound art organisation Soundpocket since April 2008. Between Sep 2009 and Feb 2010, he was an Artist In Residence for the School of Entertainment and Theatre Design in the Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts. In July 2010, he is also appointed as an Authorised Sound Consultant for Dolby Laboratories.

Samson Young

Samson Young (b.1979), Hong Kong composer and sound artist. Young was the first from Hong Kong to receive the prestigious Bloomberg Emerging Artist Award, and in 2009 CNN’s global portal named him one of the top “20 people to watch in Hong Kong.” Samson Young is a Ph.D fellow at Princeton University's department of music, where he studied with electronic music pioneer Paul Lansky. He is currently an assistant professor at the School of Creative Media, City University of Hong Kong.

Young is a regular guest at festivals around the globe, including: the Sydney Springs International New Music Festival (Australia 2001), the Canberra International Music Festival (Australia 2008), and ISCM World Musid Days (Australia 2010); the Bowdoin International Music Festival (USA 2004), Bang on a Can Music Summer Music Festival (USA 2005), Perspectives International Festival of Media Art (USA 2009), Internationales Musikinstitut Darmstadt (Germany 2006); Dark Music Days (Iceland 2008); Kuala Lumpur Contemporary Music Festival (Malaysia 2009); Microwave International New Media Arts Festival (HK 2004), October Contemporary (HK 2007 and 2009), Le French May (HK 2004 and 2009), and the Hong Kong Arts Festival (HK 2009 and 2010). His music received performances by Hong Kong Sinfonietta, New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, London NASH Ensemble, City Chamber Orchestra of Hong Kong, Bang on a Can, Network for New Music, New Millennium Ensemble, So Percussion, Sydney Song Company, and Hong Kong New Music Ensemble, among others.

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Various small gradual fires (and a bowl of resonant milk)

Steve Roden (USA)

Exhibition Dates Extended to April


2012
Plexiglass, wood, sound composition, audio equipment


Date : 13/1/2012 - 30/4/2012
(Closed on Sunday and Public Holidays)
Time : 12 - 8pm
Venue : L1, 4, 6, 7, 8

Meet-the-Artist: Steve Roden

Date : 10/1/2012
Time : 5:30 - 6:30pm
Venue : Screening Theatre (M1052), L1, CMC


Artist’s Statement

Ed Ruscha’s second seminal picture book - Various Small Fires - was self-published in Los Angeles in 1964. Like Ruscha’s book, I was born in Los Angeles the year Various Small Fires was published.

Lately, I’ve been thinking a lot about this book - not only in relation to my own history; but how each image in the book speaks, evokes, and continues to open up. Because the book contains no text nor explanations, Various Small Fires offers an open experience, with little resolve - a series of generic images of fires and one glass of milk, supposedly from “stock photographs”.

Fire, like sound, has a physical form that is relatively un-graspable and constantly changing. Both can feel ephemeral, quiet, loud, aggressive, beautiful, dangerous, moving, growing, evaporating, smoldering, smoking - and both can influence one’s experience of a landscape.

For me, Ruscha’s book is less a narrative and more a trajectory of encounters; where turning the pages of a small book is akin to wandering through various rooms and corridors of an architecture.

Thus, I have built a series of “small fires” (and one “milk”) of colored plexiglass and sound, in an attempt to converse with Daniel Libeskind’s design of the recently completed building - each in a different location, so as to allow for unexpected encounters.

The sculptural forms are a kind of “mash-up”, exploiting certain formal characteristics of both the architecture and the photographs towards new architectures and new fires. There has been no attempt to illustrate the forms, as much as allowing these sources to generate analog responses - as if the images in the book and the design of the spaces could be used as scores.

Somehow I keep thinking of fires in relation to Steve Reich’s text Music as a Gradual Process. My own audible fires were built upon a base of field recordings of fires made several years ago in Denmark and California. Other sounds include acoustic objects, small electronics, and some instruments. Their approach to repetition and evolution over time, attempts to engage Reich’s text as well.

My hope is that these “fire-sites” will offer a site for casual listening, less a destination and more a kind of “happening upon”... where one might stop to sit around the fire, and get lost in the resonant “flames”. The works seek to create spaces of pause, towards active listening and quiet mediation.

― Steve Roden, 2011


About the Artist

Steve Roden is a visual and sound artist based in Pasadena CA. He has been exhibiting and performing his work since the early 1980's. Roden has a BFA from Otis College of Art 1986, and an MFA from Art Center College of Design, 1989. His earliest work with sound was as the lead singer of the Los Angeles punk band, Seditionaries from 1979-82. Recent exhibitions include: Arte Sonoro, La Casa Encendida, Madrid; In Between: A 20 Year Survey, the Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena; Heart in Heart, National Museum Contemporary Art, Athens; Time Again, Sculpture Center, NY. Recent Performances include: John Cage's Cartridge Music with Mark Trayle, Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena; Cafe Oto, London; Redcat, Los Angeles. Roden has also released over 20 solo recordings on various labels.


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Cloud / Landscape

Christina Kubisch (Germany)


Date : 27/2/2012 – 24/3/2012
(Closed on Sunday and Public Holidays)
Time : 12 - 8pm
Venue : Study Area (M4312), L4, CMC

Electrical Walks with Christina Kubisch

(FULL BOOKING)

Date : 22/2/2012
Time : 5 - 6:30pm
Venue : lobby, ground floor of CMC

Date : 25/2/2012
Time : 3:30 - 5pm
Venue : lobby, ground floor of CMC

Free admission on a first-come, first-served basis.
Advance registration is recommended and is available only by emailing cmcinfo@cityu.edu.hk

Meet-the-Artist: Christina Kubisch

Date : 25/2/2012
Time : 5:30 - 6:30pm
Venue : Screening Theatre (M1052), L1, CMC

Opening Reception

Date : 25/2/2012
Time : 6:30 - 7:30pm
Venue : Study Area (M4312), L4, CMC


Supported by Goethe-Institut Hongkong





Cloud

Artists have always been fascinated by clouds. Some painters like John Constable dedicated a great part of their studies to clouds. Since the middle of the 2000s, a new meaning of the word has emerged: the computer cloud or cloud computing.

The digital world loves names and tags with a natural flavour such as the "mouse", an expression of the idea of lightness and romantic freedom. Reality is not quite the same.

Cloud is a heavy object, a sound installation which works with electromagnetic induction. The hanging object, made of 1,000-meter black electrical cable, is not only a visual object but also a sound sculpture. The viewer receives a special custom-made wireless headphone with which to explore the hidden acoustic world of the cloud.

The different sound channels will be mixed together by the public itself - according to their movements around and even under the cloud. The sounds will mingle and fade into each other in different, individual ways.


Landscape

Landscape is a small electrical cable structure installed in a corner of the exhibition room. Its functioning is based on the same electromagnetic induction process. The sound collage is a mixture of “natural” sounds - at least they seem to be natural, who knows.  


Electrical Walks Hong Kong

A Guided City Sound Walk 

Christina Kubisch has investigated the electromagnetic environments of public spaces since 2003. Her Electrical Walks, an ongoing series, have taken place all over the world.

The public walks around in the city with an electromagnetic map which, like a musical score, indicates an itinerary covering some of the most interesting magnetic fields of the urban environment. The sounds reveal a curious, parallel acoustic environment; a soundscape of the city that is everything but daily and ordinary. 

The Hong Kong Walk is walk number 39 of the series and the first in China. Each walk takes 10 participants. 



About the Artist

Christina Kubisch belongs to the first generation of sound artists. Trained as a composer, she has artistically developed such techniques as magnetic induction to realize her installations. Since 1986 she has added light as an artistic element to her work with sound. Christina Kubisch's work displays an artistic development which is often described as "synthesis of arts" - the discovery of acoustic space and the dimension of time in the visual arts on one hand, and a redefinition of relationships between material and form in music on the other.

Kubisch has received awards and grants, including the German Industrial Association award (1988), composition grant of the city of Berlin (2000), Honorary German Sound Art Award (2008), Prix Ars Electronica Honorary Mention Digital Music (2008) and Saarländischer Rundfunk Media Art Award (2009). She has been invited for residencies at the Banff Centre for the Arts, (Canada), Djerassi Resident Artist Program (California,USA), IASPIS (Stockholm, Sweden), DIVA, Danish International Visiting Artists program (Copenhagen) and the art centre Doual'art (Doualla, Cameroun).

Christina Kubisch has presented her works worldwide since 1974 in solo exhibitions and performances in galleries and museums in Europe, USA, Australia, Japan and South America. She has participated numerous international festivals and exhibitions such as Pro Musica Nova, Bremen (1976 and1980), Für Augen und Ohren, Berlin (1980), Biennale of Venice (1980 and 1982), Gaudeamus Music Festival Holland (1984,) documenta 8, Kassel (1987), Ars Electronica, Linz (1987), Biennale of Sydney (1990), Donaueschinger Musiktage, (1993,1997,2011), Prison Sentences, Philadelphia (1995), Sonambiente, Berlin (1996, 2006) festival d’art sonor, Barcelona (1999), Sonic Boom, London (2000), Visual Sound, Pittsburgh (2001), Singuhr-Hörgalerie, Berlin (2002), Activating the Medium, San Franciso (2003), Sounding Spaces, Tokyo (2003), Resonance, ZKM Karlsruhe (2005), Her Noise, London (2005), Stockholm New Music (2006), Mois Multi, Quebec (2008), Tonspur, Vienna (2009). RUHR. 2010, Essen (2010), Salon du SUD, Doualla (2010), Gateways, Tallinn (2010) among many others.

She has lectured and taught in numerous institutions and is the Professor for Audiovisual Art at the Academy of Fine Arts, Saarbrücken, Germany and a member of the Akademie der Künste Berlin. She lives in Hoppegarten near Berlin.

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